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May, 2004

Prisoner Abuses by US Military

Rape of Iraqi Women

BAGHDAD, Sept. 20, 2006 — A United Nations report says that 5,106 people in Baghdad died violent deaths during July and August, 2006, a number far higher than reports that have relied on figures from the city’s morgue. The report also describes evidence of torture on many of the bodies found in Baghdad, including gouged-out eyeballs and wounds from nails, power drills and acid. Torture remains widespread, not only by death squads but also in official detention centers, according to United Nations officials. Torture in Iraq is reportedly worse now than it was under deposed president Saddam Hussein, the United Nations' chief anti-torture expert said.

George Bush = Kim Jong II in World's Eyes - Chicago Tribune, 11-17-03: A poll of 7,500 Europeans, done by EOS Gallup Europe for the European Commission, showed that they ranked Bush second -- in a tie with North Korea's Kim Jong Il -- among leaders who pose the greatest threat to world peace. Israel Prime Minister Ariel Sharon ranked first.


Operation Enduring Freedom?

The following photos are shocking and disgusting. They show criminal acts in progress by uniformed military personnel in Iraq. The crimes are being committed against unarmed and defenseless civilians. There is no evidence that any of these victims were guilty of anything other than resisting the invasion and occupation of their own country. Women are being raped in their own bomb damaged homes. Perhaps their husbands, fathers and brothers were already killed.

In the spring of 2003, George W. Bush and his administration invaded Iraq in violation of international law after declaring to the world that they would consider themselves answerable to no one. They were essentially using the US military for their own private purposes, men and women who are ostensibly paid to defend the United States, not to invade other nations. The US has been paying for this with taxpayers money -- money that was supposed to be used for schools, roads and services for U.S. citizens, creating a huge deficit that threatens the future of our nation. The Bush administration bombed Iraq, destroyed much of the government infrastructure, killed many thousands of civilians as well as many thousands of men who were legitimately defending Iraq against the invasion, raided homes, rounded up and abducted 10,000 men without charges, imprisoned them, then tortured them.

Bush did a similar thing in Afghanistan under the guise of retaliation for 9-11. However, 9-11 was a crime committed by Saudis, not Afghans. There is no evidence whatsoever that the thousands of people killed and wounded in Afghanistan had anything to do with 9-11, or even knew about it. There is no evidence whatsoever that the "detainees" in Guantanamo Bay had the slightest involvement in 9-11. Instead, the invasion, bombing and occupation of Afghanistan is an international crime - a violation of international treaties and laws.

Why did Bush and his people do this? Weapons of mass destruction? A lie. Links to Al Queda? A lie. 9-11? Another lie.They are doing this in order to secure the oil wealth of Iraq for the benefit of American corporations. In essence, Bush and his oil industry chums are robbing the world's gas station, Iraq, the second largest oil reserve in the world, in full daylight, in front of the world, using our men and women in uniform and our tax dollars, squandered under a smoke screen of lies, deception, rhetoric, threats against anyone who disagrees, and propaganda.

Bill Clinton was impeached for having consensual sex in private. If George W. Bush gets away with the monstrous crimes he is responsible for, it will show to the world that the United States government is morally bankrupt, and with its excessive military power under the control of a few rich men, an immense threat to all of civilization.


These rape photos were pervertedly posted on the porn site Iraqbabes.com and described there as real rapes of Iraqi women by military personnel in Iraq. The pro-war propaganda machine then labeled the photos "fakes" because they had been posted on a porn site. Presumably, the propaganda machine wanted people to think that the photos were staged porn shots, not actual rapes. However, as soon as the propaganda began, the porn site was taken down so no one could see the photos described there as actual rapes, not staged shots. Nevertheless, the pro-war people have wildly embraced the idea that the photos below are fake porn shots produced in a studio of some sort. Take a good look at them and decide for yourself.

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BUSH WAR CRIMES - June 18, 2008: The Army general who led the investigation into prisoner abuse at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison accused the Bush administration Wednesday of committing "war crimes" and called for those responsible to be held to account.


General who probed Abu Ghraib says Bush officials committed war crimes

June 18, 2008 - By Warren P. Strobel | McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON - The Army general who led the investigation into prisoner abuse at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison accused the Bush administration Wednesday of committing "war crimes" and called for those responsible to be held to account.

The remarks by Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba, who's now retired, came in a new report that found that U.S. personnel tortured and abused detainees in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, using beatings, electrical shocks, sexual humiliation and other cruel practices.

"After years of disclosures by government investigations, media accounts and reports from human rights organizations, there is no longer any doubt as to whether the current administration has committed war crimes," Taguba wrote. "The only question that remains to be answered is whether those who ordered the use of torture will be held to account."

Taguba, whose 2004 investigation documented chilling abuses at Abu Ghraib, is thought to be the most senior official to have accused the administration of war crimes. "The commander in chief and those under him authorized a systematic regime of torture," he wrote.

A White House spokeswoman, Kate Starr, had no comment. Taguba didn't respond to a request for further comment relayed via a spokesman. The group Physicians for Human Rights, which compiled the new report, described it as the most in-depth medical and psychological examination of former detainees to date.

Doctors and mental health experts examined 11 detainees held for long periods in the prison system that President Bush established after the 9-11 terrorist attacks. All of them eventually were released without charges.
The doctors and experts determined that the men had been subject to cruelties that ranged from isolation, sleep deprivation and hooding to electric shocks, beating and, in one case, being forced to drink urine. Bush has said repeatedly that the United States doesn't condone torture.

"All credible allegations of abuse are thoroughly investigated and, if substantiated, those responsible are held accountable," said Navy Cmdr. J.D. Gordon, a Pentagon spokesman. The Defense Department responds to concerns raised by the International Committee for the Red Cross, he said, which has access to detainees under military control.

"It adds little to the public discourse to draw sweeping conclusions based upon dubious allegations regarding remote medical assessments of former detainees, now far removed from detention," Gordon said. The physicians' group said that its experts, who had experience studying torture's effects, spent two days with each former captive and conducted intensive exams and interviews. They administered tests to detect exaggeration. In two of the 11 cases, the group was able to review medical records.

The report, "Broken Laws, Broken Lives," concurs with a five-part McClatchy investigation of Guantanamo. Among its findings were that abuses occurred - primarily at prisons in Afghanistan where detainees were held en route to Guantanamo - and that many of the prisoners were wrongly detained. Also this week, a probe by the Senate Armed Services Committee revealed how senior Pentagon officials pushed for harsher interrogation methods over the objections of top military lawyers. Those methods later surfaced in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld didn't specifically approve of the worst abuses, but neither he nor the White House enforced strict limits on how detainees would be treated. There was no "bright line of abuse which could not be transgressed," former Navy general counsel Alberto Mora told the Senate committee.

Leonard Rubenstein, the president of Physicians for Human Rights, said there was a direct connection between the Pentagon decisions and the abuses his group uncovered. "The result was a horrific stew of pain, degradation and ... suffering," he said. Detainee abuse has been documented previously, in photos from Abu Ghraib, accounts by former detainees and their lawyers and a confidential report by the International Committee for the Red Cross that was leaked to the U.S. news media.

Of the 11 men evaluated in the Physicians for Human Rights report, four were detained in Afghanistan between late 2001 and early 2003, and later sent to Guantanamo. The remaining seven were detained in Iraq in 2003. One of the Iraqis, identified by the pseudonym Laith, was arrested with his family at his Baghdad home in the early morning of Oct. 19, 2003. He was taken to a location where he was beaten, stripped to his underwear and threatened with execution, the report says.

"Laith" told the examiners he was then taken to a second site, where he was photographed in humiliating positions and given electric shocks to his genitals. Finally, he was taken to Abu Ghraib, where he spent the first 35 to 40 days in isolation in a small cage, enduring being suspended in the cage and other "stress positions."

He was released on June 24, 2004, without charge.